Meaning of cherry blossoms and its positive effects on your body and mind

meaning-of-cherry-blossom

Spring is just around the corner and this is a very special time of the year in Japan. The whole nation awaits for this special season when the delicate pink cherry trees (sakura in Japanese) bloom just for a few days, before the wind blows them away, creating a pink storm.

Spring also marks new beginning for many in Japan. Most schools begin school year in April and new employees start their careers after graduating from school. Spring light is soft and the air is warm and fresh.

Everyone eagerly awaits for the sakura season that national televisions would televise the “sakura frontlines” on the map every morning starting from Okinawa down south in March all the way north to Hokkaido where the cherry trees bloom in early May.

While sakura is elegant and beautiful to look at, it also has tremendous healing effects as well that not everyone is aware. Here are some of the sakura products which are beneficial to your body and mind.

cherry-blossom-essential-oil

Aroma therapy

One popular way of using cherry blossoms for healing is by using essential oils. It has calming effects on your mind and helps to ease anxiety and emotional pain.

Cherry blossom aroma also helps to relax your body and promotes blood circulation. Mixing a few drops of the essential oil in a cream or add a few drops to your bath water will soften your skin while the aroma will help you relax.

Incense sticks

Incense sticks and cones are often used in Japanese homes. Just like aroma oils, sakura incenses have calming effect on your mind and can help ease stress. Read my post “Incense recommendations – fragrance for relaxation” on different types of incenses.

Sakura blossoms and leaves

Both cherry blossoms and leaves can be eaten and are both widely consumed in Japan. Flowers are often pickled in salt and vinegar and used in tea, Japanese sweats (wagashi) and in traditional cooking as decoration.

meaning of cherry blossom

Leaves are also pickled and used for traditional sweets such as “sakura mochi” (cherry rice cake) which is often eaten in early spring.

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